Sweet Johnnie and Harding University – Part 2

Yesterday’s blog erroneously indicated that Johnnie worked in the cafeteria at Cathcart.  I knew better but for some reason I did not put the real name in the blog, which should have been Pattie Cobb Cafeteria.  In fact she stayed her semester in Pattie Cobb Dorm.  If you want to check out more about Pattie Cobb you might go to Liz Harrell’s blog of March 26, 2015 that describes some spooky things about Pattie Cobb.  Perhaps that is why I did not get the name right in the first place (https://elizabeth-harrell.com).

My daughter, Dorcas (also a graduate of Harding), pointed out to me that I should have told one of her mother’s favorite stories about mixing the eggs for breakfast.  Johnnie would tell the story of having a rather large pot that she was to fill with fresh eggs just cracked and dropped in the pot.  How to fish out one of those eggs that did not look so good among the other 50 eggs or so?  You didn’t.  Just go ahead and process the bunch.  The heat would kill the bacteria hopefully.  Does anybody know how to solve that problem?

Johnnie was a very disappointed young lady when she had to return to West Texas State College to finish her college education.  She just loved her roommate who was from Japan.  She had fallen deeply in love with Harding.  So much so that she insisted our children go to Harding or pay their own way somewhere else.  This strong advise has also applied to our grandchildren and it looks like our great grandchildren might get this same strong advise.

The Lord apparently directed that all of this happen because I had been praying since I was 16 that God send me the perfect mate.  I was home from the Korean War and not yet discharged when Steve Eckstein took me to Harding to look the place over.  That was in the summer of 1951.  Everything seemed ok but too restrictive for me.  Also the GI bill for the Korean War Veterans had not been passed yet because the war was still going on when I was rotated out.  I had to work my way through Junior College in Odessa where I could work as a Theater Projectionist and go to school at the same time.

My professor at Odessa College, Leonard Pack, suggested that I get my BS degree at West Texas State because Professor Whaley was the best in getting his students into medical school.  Go somewhere else and the professors might not be interested enough in his/her students to give them that extra push to get the medical school entrance exam score high enough to get admitted.

Fast forward to September 1953 when I arrived in Canyon, Texas and could not find a job as a theater projectionist due to the union situation.  I had to take up a job driving a taxi in Amarillo at night in  order to enroll.  Still no GI Bill.

I met Johnnie briefly in the Bible Chair during an introductory session where the Bible Professor had us all sitting in a circle.  I had just taken a memory course at Texas Tech and this helped a lot because the game was for the first in the circle to say their name.  The second one was to say the first person’s name and then their name.  You get the picture.  I was pretty close to the end of the line because I did not know what was going on.  By the time it got to me I was able to say the name of the 20 or so in front of me and my name as well.  I was surprised at that time that I remembered my name.  Johnnie told me years later that under her breath she asked someone “who is that old smarty”?

Unfortunately I could not make enough money driving the taxi and could not study well enough to keep my grades up so I left school and went back to Odessa and drove a truck for the Western Company.  They sent us out on jobs that took 36 hours to perform pumping acid down into the oil and gas wells (fracking).  During that time the government did get the GI Bill approved for the Korean War Veterans and I was able to return to West Texas State.

Stay tuned for the third installment.

 

 

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